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There are no Promises in Prometheus





It’s been a long time since I left a movie so disappointed as yesterday after seeing Prometheus. In the past movies like Matrix Reloaded, Transformers, the Star Wars Prequels left me a bit unsatisfied, but I still enjoyed some parts of them and let them be what they are. But yesterday, I was constantly bored by the movie, it had such high promises, I mean how can you go wrong with a prequel to one of the best horror movies ever made, from a director of classic epic movies and a great cast?. But in the end I felt the movie was such a mess, didn’t really felt any direction, the characters don't act logically, not even the robot. The music is distracting, the story and motivations that push the movie forward feel like an afterthought. Even trying to tie everything together to the Alien Franchise fails miserably.







The cinematography is the high point of the movie, as is almost always the case in Ridley Scott’s movies, so no surprise in this regard. The music is too distracting; in many places no music would have added to the tension of the moment. But when big horns and drums start playing in the background, it takes away from the spectator’s concentration.






The acting of Charlize Theron and Michael Fassbender are very good, even though the characters really don’t have clear purposes. This is also the case of the hero, Noomi Rapace, whose performance is adequate but everyone else steals her thunder. Why should we care for her if she doesn't even seem to be in the same room with everyone else?


In the end I think all the problems I saw in the movie, besides the music, are related to bad scriptwriting. If the conflicts, motivations or actions are not clear, everything else will fail to deliver; this was also the case in the Star Wars prequels, and Matrix Sequels. You can have a richly and interesting universe, but is the people that inhabit it that keep us coming back for more.

http://www.projectprometheus.com/
20th Century-Fox presents a film directed by Ridley Scott. Written by Jon Spaihts and Damon Lindelof. Running time: 124 minutes.

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